I photograph for the simple desire to do so. With my photography I live my personal instants, and I draw from them a personal line of emotions and childlike amazement.

 

When I was a child, I spent 2 weeks in Germany with my family; with a camera given to me by my father, I recorded the Italian people and places I encountered. I was 12 and since that moment I have been taking photos.

 

That experience changed my life. I realized that I had been struck by the beauty, simplicity, and dignity of daily life.

 

My first love, the photographer who first gave me a new vision is Robert Frank: I was always impressed by his documentary photography, and when I picked up his book for the first time ‘The Americans’, I was enamoured.

 

One of my last meetings I had in Paris, was with the Russian photographer Gueorgui Pinkhassov. I consider him to be like a documentary photographer, but with a really, new, unique vision. In his book “Sightwalk”, the reader dives into the ocean to discover the treasures that Pinkhassov captured.

 

This kind of photography is not easy to understand immediately, instead the viewer must pause and reflect, in order to feel the emotions the photographer captured in the images.

 

Maybe I’m going to take a different approach to my photography today.

 

The reaction I aim to evoke in the viewer evolves with my life. I’d like to appeal to those who want to experience my thoughts. I’m not looking for the instants, but I want to convey the intimacy of my vision.

 

Following Uta Barth's thinking, I want my photography to be like an empty vessel that the viewer stands before. From that very moment the viewers must fill this vessel and project themselves into a space which is both public and private.

 

(revised by Holly Streader)